About - Markus Schilder Photograph.

ABOUT SECTION

Biography


Passion, passion it takes to be out there, well before everyone else and well before the sun makes its daily often majestic appearance. Even before this recurring daily festival, the night often offers the last glimpses at stars...


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Post Processing methods


Images coming straight out of modern day cameras are rarely exciting. Every single images goes through a post processing method. I mostly use Photoshop and the Camera Raw module. I have developed my own Camera Raw settings...


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Spotting


Plane Spotting at Charles de Gaulle airport Paris



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Along the road


Each country seems to have its own particular style and custom. Each country seems to have its own way of saying hello. In Colombia it's all potatoes, in China all fish. And in Japan, all earthquakes. I guess, I need to explain a little more...


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Architecture


Architecture can be extremely challenging at times. Most architectural photographs are composed of several images and later combined using different software. Even the widest of lenses never seem wide enough to avoid distortion...


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Coming Soon


Under construction...



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BIOGRAPHY
© Jean-Francois DEROUBAIX
https://deroubaix.photoshelter.com
Passion, passion it takes to be out there, well before everyone else and well before the sun makes its daily often majestic appearance. Even before this recurring daily festival, the night often offers the last glimpses at stars. When night and day shake hands, the camera is already set in a planned spot to capture those ephemeral moments. The anticipation runs high, the passion is well alive. And then it happens. Shyly the first rays of light fill the sky with beautiful warm light and colors. That's the moment it clicks! And how rewarding it is!
Being out there confirms my choice of leaving a safe and well paid job as a computer engineer over and over again. Well, photography has not been the first choice of professional work in life, but after some years programming networks, the desire to change ever grew so indefinitely. Secondary studies allowed for becoming a professional photographer. To make use of the latest professional development and to put Nikon F4's to some serious work, Australia, Vietnam, Hong Kong, Mainland China and later Russia found their way into my viewfinder and later onto film roll. Prior to leaving for this long journey Kodak had proposed to do a calendar of my work upon returning.
And as quick as weather changes, life changes too - sometimes. Returning from Russia proved to be a life changer. The initial return to Germany was scrapped and life started anew in France's capital Paris. The French agency Rapho/TOP accepted my images and we signed a contract. By this time, documentaries about France, from north to south, were on the daily agenda. Photographing the winemakers in France's south west was in particular rewarding - from the photography point of view and the hedonistic one too. The welcome at those properties was fabulous and often ended in getting a taste of the wine while sharing a meal.
As photography has myriads of specialities, a passion for architecture emerged over the years. Perspective control due to mathematical remodeling represents a real challenge. Often as many as 36 individual images are used to get one image right. Well, after all, I now am combining my passion for photography and my mathematical knowledge from my first career as an engineer.
La Défense

I have combined several different technics in this image. The image is perfectly straight, using the tilt-shift lens and the exposure is about 120seconds, using a neutral density filter.

LEAVING BIOGRAPHY
POST PROCESSING
Images coming straight out of modern day cameras are rarely exciting. Every single images goes through post processing. I mostly use Photoshop and its Camera Raw module. I have developed my own Camera Raw settings over the years. My images never have pure white nor pure black. This can be very tricky at times, but every minute spent to get the most out of shadows and highlights is worth the effort. This can take an already good image to a spectacular one. My particular love goes to soft tonal images.
BEFORE / AFTER
Image after post processing.
Please read further to find out more.
First I import the image into Camera Raw. The histogram gives a first look at RGB color distribution and if there are any pixels, which at this point are either pure white (255,255,255) or pure black (0,0,0). This image is well balanced coming out of the camera, but there is such much more to enhance in shadows. To correct this, I simply use the adjustment brush. I crank the exposure to +2.05 and draw along the shadow part of the image. This has got to be one of the easiest ways to instantly improve parts of the image, without getting into much more time consuming editing, using layer masks and blend modes in Photoshop.
As the image is nicely balanced and just the way I like it, I now change color balance of the image, just like selective color adjustment in Photoshop. I enhance the orange channel and take out some saturation in the yellow channel. This adjustment really comes down to personal feel. I try to recreate the same mood and the exact colors I saw, when I shot the iamge. This beautiful hall of the Beaux-Arts Paris is so colorful and amazingly decorated. By adjusting the exposure of the low light area, I have created a colorful and close to reality image. One more adjustment and this image is already finished.
Before importing the image into Photoshop, I change the global adjustment. The color temperature is somewhere between sunlight (5500K) coming through the glass roof and the color temperature in the shadow area (3500 Kelvin). I finally settle on 4750 Kelvin, as this gives the image the best of both worlds. Shooting the image, I had already prepared for post processing and chosen the lowest ISO setting of the camera. I did this, as I wanted to use a great adjustment in Camera RAW: the shadow slider. Very low ISO settings give great flexibility to work on shdows without generating too much noise. Here, this worked perfectly well. To finish the image, I import it into Photoshop, duplicate the layer and use the High Pass filter, set to around 1.5 pixel, mode overlay. Save and publish. All done.

SPOTTING

BOEING 777


Air France Skyteam alliance Triple 7 at take off from Terminal 1 at CDG.

SPOTTING at Charles de Gaulle airport


Dream. Men's dream it was to fly. Mankind tried to fly over centuries. Free like a bird... A mere 100 years ago, on the 17.12.1903 the Wright brothers successfully took to the air in a sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft. The science of controlled flight grew rapidly and just 40 years later, the first jet engines were produced in war-torn Europe. I discovered spotting around three years ago. After dropping off friends at the airport, I took some time and drove around Charles de Gaulle airport and was amazed about how close one actually can get to the planes. Everywhere you go,the smell of kerosene lingers in the air. This intoxication smell makes me dream about far away destinations and aircrafts, of course.

BOEING 777


An Air France Triple 7 leaving Paris. Dramatic display of engine thrust and heat development against the setting sun.

AIRBUS A380


Korean Air leaving Paris for Seoul. Further back a Boeing 757 of Icelandair waits for the Korean Airs departure to taxi to Terminal 1.
Today planes leave Charles de Gaulle airport in Paris about every two minutes to many different destination. Since I first discovered the airport I have added many different spots to see planes taxiing, departing and arriving. As the aircraft taxies to the runway, the pilot revs the engines and the sound can be heart miles away. But the moment the plane takes off and the turbofans are revved to their maximum the air reverberates and the pressure can be felt all around. I prefer large engines, engineered to go way beyond 6 hours of travel, mostly found in large aircrafts like Boeing’s 787, 747-8 and Airbus A380, A340 and A350. Spectacular moments happen when the aircrafts land too, in particular in rainy conditions. Once the plane has landed, the pilot reverses the engine’s thrust and to reduce speed.
Out at the airport, I don't simply try to take photos of planes. I try to capture unique moments. If weather conditions are fine, which really happens - as always - right after sunrise and right before sunset. The following image is one of my favorites. Rainy conditions in the early evening allowed for this image.

ARCHITECTURE

Architecture can be extremely challenging at times. Most architectural photographs are composed of several images and later combined using different software. Even the widest of lenses never seem wide enough to avoid distortion. And, of course, there is never enough space to back up and fit the whole scene in. Two different technics allow for perspective compensation: tilt-shift lenses and the use of a panorama head. Both technics ask for post processing in Photoshop. Using a panorama head needs careful planning and the results can be spectacular. Images can be composed of nearly 50 individual takes.
This image of La Défense shows the EDF building perspective corrected. The pyramid like shape of the building reflects a taxi, a nice twist to this architectural image. The warm evening light paints part of the facade in orange and yellow. La Défense has become my secret garden over the years, as it is easy to access and even makes for a welcome break in the evening or early in the morning. Paris has few high raisers and the concentration of tall buildings offer plenty of photo opportunities.

Coming soon
Architecture


Architecture can be extremely challenging at times. Most architectural photographs are composed of several images and later combined using different software. Even the widest of lenses never seem wide enough to avoid distortion. And, of course, there is never enough space to back up and fit the whole scene in. Two different technics allow for perspective compensation: tilt-shift lenses and the use of a panorama head. Both technics ask for post processing in Photoshop. Using a panorama head needs careful planning and the results can be spectacular. Images can be composed of nearly 50 individual takes.



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